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Accession #LCNNDHSSNS01

12.00
LCNNDHSSNS01.jpg
THKSSD01_01.jpg

Accession #LCNNDHSSNS01

12.00

1.8" x 1.7"
3D Relief Pin
Double Posted
Rubber Clasps

Inspired by "Laocoön and His Sons" by Agesander, Athenodoros and Polydorus

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1.8" x 1.7"
3D Relief Pin
Double Posted
Rubber Clasps

Inspired by "Laocoön and His Sons" by Agesander, Athenodoros and Polydorus

The statue of Laocoön and His Sons, also called the Laocoön Group (Italian: Gruppo del Laocoonte), has been one of the most famous ancient sculptures ever since it was excavated in Rome in 1506 and placed on public display in the Vatican, where it remains. It is very likely the same statue as that praised in the highest terms by the main Roman writer on art, Pliny the Elder. The figures are near life-size and the group is a little over 2 m (6 ft 7 in) in height, showing the Trojan priest Laocoön and his sons Antiphantes and Thymbraeus being attacked by sea serpents.

The group has been "the prototypical icon of human agony" in Western art, and unlike the agony often depicted in Christian art showing the Passion of Jesus and martyrs, this suffering has no redemptive power or reward. The suffering is shown through the contorted expressions of the faces (Charles Darwin pointed out that Laocoön's bulging eyebrows are physiologically impossible), which are matched by the struggling bodies, especially that of Laocoön himself, with every part of his body straining.

Learn more about the work that inspired this pin HERE.